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19 of the Highest Paying Insurance Adjuster Jobs in 2024

The best Insurance Adjuster jobs can pay up to $100,000 per year.

An Insurance Adjuster, also known as a Claims Adjuster is a professional who assesses insurance claims of all kinds. They help decide if there should be a payout for each claim and, according to the policy and the circumstances, how much should be paid. Insurance Adjusters make this determination by speaking with the one who filed the claim, assessing any damages, speaking with witnesses, and reading reports filed by officials. The Adjuster will typically come in-person to speak with you and take pictures of the damage before writing the report.

Insurance Adjusters are employed by all kinds of insurance providers, from health to home, to auto, and more. However, Insurance Adjuster jobs are not increasing in demand. Growth in this field is expected to be relatively flat over the next ten years, with a possible decrease of 1%.

High Paying Insurance Adjuster Jobs

  • Damage Inside Adjuster

    Salary range: $96,000-$100,000 per year

    The majority of Damage Inside Adjuster salaries across the United States currently range between $96,000 (25th percentile) and $100,000 (75th percentile) annually. Most people working in this role make similar salaries regardless of skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Damage Inside Adjuster job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Damage Recovery Specialist

    Salary range: $50,500-$98,500 per year

    The majority of Damage Recovery Specialist salaries across the United States currently range between $50,500 (25th percentile) and $98,500 (75th percentile) annually. This large range of salary potential suggests there may be many opportunities for advancement and increased pay depending on skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Damage Recovery Specialist job market in the United States is somewhat active, with a few companies hiring.

  • Auto Damage Estimator

    Auto damage estimators inspect vehicles after an accident to determine what types of repairs are necessary. They usually work for insurance or appraisal companies, collision repair shops, or vehicle manufacturers. In this role, you perform a visual inspection of the automobile, document the damage in your files and with photos, and create a list of problems and required repairs. You use your observations to estimate repair costs, investigate insurance and warranty information to estimate coverage, and provide and explain claim and settlement details to clients. Depending on your specific job duties, you may also be responsible for handling client disputes over how much the insurance company should cover.

  • Independent Insurance Adjuster

    Independent Insurance Adjusters investigate and manage claims submitted to insurers. Claims can involve a variety of areas, including property damage or loss, personal injury, or workers’ compensation. Independent Insurance Adjusters are self-employed, so insurance agencies hire them when needed. An Independent Insurance Adjuster reviews documentation and evidence related to the claim, conducts interviews with all parties involved, and determines the validity of the request. Once the case has been analyzed thoroughly, the adjuster will make recommendations for a settlement.

  • Property Field Adjuster

    The job duties of a property field adjuster focus on working onsite to investigate insurance claims and make decisions about coverage and payouts. In this career, you travel to the insured property, where your responsibilities include collecting information and making an inspection of damage. You calculate loss and create a report to show to the insurance company that you represent. If necessary, you interview claimants and collect public information about the incident that caused the loss of property. Your responsibilities also include reviewing the insurance policy to determine coverage eligibility and negotiating with claimants to settle a valid claim.

  • Property Claims Adjuster

    A property claims adjuster is a specialized insurance inspector whose job is to inspect property damage, such as wind or flood damage to a commercial or residential building, and assess how much an insurance company should pay based on the policy terms of coverage. As a property claims adjuster, your duties and responsibilities include interviewing the policyholder and other witnesses to the damage, investigating the damage, and analyzing other records. You may consult with other experts, such as engineers and lawyers, to determine the scope of the claim. You then write a report and pass it on to an examiner, whose job it is to approve or deny claims.

  • Field Adjuster

    A field adjuster—or a field claims adjuster—works for an insurance company to assess the damage reported from an insurance claim and decide how much a claimant should be compensated. As a field adjuster, you travel to meet with the claimant and view the subject of the claim. Also, you may verify that the claimant has a valid policy and then investigate the circumstances leading up to the event and the resulting loss or injury. Other responsibilities of this job include working with lawyers and law enforcement to ensure the validity of a case and determining if the claimant should receive payment for any damages.

  • Casualty Adjuster

    The majority of Casualty Adjuster salaries across the United States currently range between $67,000 (25th percentile) and $84,000 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Casualty Adjuster job market in the United States is somewhat active, with a few companies hiring.

  • Bodily Injury Adjuster

    Despite what one may think, a bodily injury adjuster does not adjust bodily injuries. Rather, as a bodily injury adjuster, you manage, investigate, and resolve the injury portion of an insurance claim. You read insurance policies, verify coverage, contact all parties associated with the claim, interview clients, speak with witnesses, gather, and audit medical bills and other details on the treatment needed of those injured in an accident. Your responsibilities also include determining liability and negotiating with customers and other insurance carriers. Some positions require you to attend trials and hearings, and you prepare reports summarizing the results. Other duties include keeping the financial processing of claims secure, updating files, and providing reports as requested.

  • Claims Adjuster

    The job of a claims adjuster is to help settle insurance claims. Adjusters generally inspect the damage and work with claimants. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the duties of a claims adjuster include researching and determining how much a claim should be paid, gathering evidence, photos, and statements from claimants, and protecting the company against fraud. There are several types of claims adjusters. Public adjusters work independently to give second opinions on claims. Appraisers assign value to damage, and insurance investigators ensure claims are not fraudulent.

  • Adjuster

    Salary range: $50,000-$75,000 per year

    An insurance adjuster, or claims adjuster, is an insurance professional who helps assess situations that result in insurance claims. Insurance adjusters verify that the claimant has a valid policy and then investigates the circumstances leading up to the event and the resulting loss or injury, including working with lawyers and law enforcement, when necessary. They then help determine if the claimant should receive a payout and for how much; this includes the negotiating process, if applicable.

  • Insurance Investigator

    An insurance investigator works for an insurance company looking into insurance claims, usually when the claim may be fraudulent. As an insurance claims investigator, you gather information from the insurance adjuster, law enforcement, witnesses, and the claimant. You also make investigative inquiries to determine if the claim is valid or fraudulent. Your job is to document all evidence and present the case to your employer so that the insurance company is protected from false claims.

  • Auto Damage Adjuster

    The responsibilities of an auto damage adjuster include evaluating an insurance claim and determining an appropriate settlement. You evaluate the damage done to a vehicle and determine automotive repair costs that insurance companies pay. Your responsibilities include providing an estimate of the costs of parts and labor based on standard industry prices, working with repair shops to determine a final cost for the insurance company, and preparing insurance forms recording those costs and other recommendations. If there is a disagreement with an auto shop and the repairs needed, you hire an appraiser to settle the issue. Other duties include writing contracts and deciding whether repairs are needed. You may check the vehicle’s market value before the accident and if any of the value is eligible for reimbursement. You also gather information such as photos, videos, and audio recordings of accident witnesses.

  • Auto Claims Adjuster

    Salary range: $49,500-$64,500 per year

    Auto Claims Adjusters work directly with insured individuals, specifically after those clients have experienced some kind of automobile accident. Once a customer files an insurance claim, the Auto Claims Adjuster contacts that individual to research the situation and facilitate the insurance payout. They make direct phone calls to clients and represent their company accordingly, answering questions and providing empathy and guidance throughout a sometimes stressful process. They help interpret what the customer’s specific insurance plan covers and calculate how much their company will pay. Auto Claims Adjusters inspect the damaged vehicles, obtain police reports, and negotiate repair work with body shops. They provide updates to their clients and ensure that the repair shop is meeting deadlines appropriately.

  • Material Damage Appraiser

    Salary range: $43,000-$61,000 per year

    A material damage appraiser evaluates and settles insurance claims by assigning appropriate value to items. As a material damage appraiser, you typically work for an insurance company or independent agency and may review cars, property, and other valuables. Your responsibilities include determining an item’s value based on the condition, ensuring claims are legitimate, providing an estimate on cost if repair is needed, deciding the final amount to be paid, and negotiating settlements. You also contact doctors, employers, and other individuals for additional information on potentially fraudulent claims that require investigation.

  • Damage Adjuster

    Salary range: $42,000-$56,000 per year

    The majority of Damage Adjuster salaries across the United States currently range between $42,000 (25th percentile) and $56,000 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Damage Adjuster job market in the United States is active, with some companies hiring.

  • Damage Assessor

    The duties of a damage assessor involve working to inspect properties and estimate the cost of repair. As a storm damage assessor, for example, you travel to a region after a weather-related disaster and examine the building or home of an insurance client to assess the damage caused by a storm. In this career, your responsibilities could include interviewing the owner of the property and investigating their possessions to find out if the disaster in question caused the damage. Some insurance companies call damage assessors "claims adjusters."

  • General Adjuster

    A general adjuster is an insurance professional that is responsible for analyzing incidents to determine the financial liability of the insurance company. As a general adjuster, your duties revolve around researching the property or physical damage related to insurance claims. You assess the cause of the incident, the extent of the damage, and the cost of repairs. Your research may require you to conduct interviews with law enforcement, medical professionals, and eyewitnesses to investigate the claims thoroughly. Essential qualifications for this career include investigative research experience and interpersonal skills.

  • Auto Damage Trainee

    An auto damage trainee learns about auto body damage, how to determine a repair estimate, and the process for insurance claims adjusting. An auto damage trainee receives classroom and real-world training to practice the skills needed to work as an auto damage or accident claims adjuster. Common job duties include traveling to vehicle sites such as repair shops, inspecting vehicles to assess damage, providing a cost estimate of needed repairs, and negotiating settlements with insurance clients. Their responsibilities are to honor clients’ insurance coverage while making cost-effective decisions for the company.