Climate Change Could Create New Jobs in Disaster Management

U.S. employers are investing in mitigating the effects of climate change and preparing for the possibility of ever costlier natural disasters, a ZipRecruiter analysis of job postings for people with disaster management expertise reveals. Employers have already posted many more jobs for emergency management and disaster assistance/response professionals in the first nine months of 2019 than in all of 2018. Overall, they are on pace to post 37% more jobs in those roles this year. 

The trend is welcome news as we come to the end of National Preparedness Month, a time when Americans are reminded to be prepared for disasters and emergencies in their homes, businesses, and neighborhoods. 

Note: Green bars show job posting volumes for all of 2017 and 2018, and for 2019 year-to-date. Grey bars show projected job posting volumes for the remainder of 2019. 

Job postings for first responders, such as firefighters and paramedics, are also increasing rapidly. That suggests U.S. employers–both public and private–aren’t taking any chances. Job posting totals for first responders are already on par with those from 2017 and 2018, and on track to surpass them by more than 30%.

Note: Green bars show job posting volumes for all of 2017 and 2018, and for 2019 year-to-date. Grey bars show projected job posting volumes for the remainder of 2019. 

There is also increased employer interest in risk managers and risk analysts–people trained to identify and prioritize risks and allocate resources appropriately.

For job seekers worried about the threat of climate change, pursuing a career in a field related to emergency/disaster/risk management is one way to make a positive contribution. As the problem receives increased attention, businesses and government agencies will come under increased pressure to find solutions and develop strategies for dealing with catastrophic events. Demand for relevant skills will only grow.  

Note: Green bars show job posting volumes for all of 2017 and 2018, and for 2019 year-to-date. Grey bars show projected job posting volumes for the remainder of 2019. 

 

Julia Pollak

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ZipRecruiter's Labor Economist, Julia Pollak conducts job market research and provides unique insights to job seekers, employers, and the ZipRecruiter leadership team.

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