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25 of the Highest Paying Librarian Jobs in 2024

The best Librarian jobs can pay up to $127,000 per year.

Librarians do everything from organizing community events and programs to helping professionals and students research scholarly and public information in libraries. They educate patrons on technology, offer help finding obscure legal records, business competitor data, and various other information, and provide book recommendations. They are knowledgeable on several topics and can give computer tips and advice on general library materials, including graphic novels, movies, and other media available for check-out.

As educators, school librarians are responsible for teaching students the value of reading and improving their reading skills through lessons, interactive storytelling, and hands-on activities. Educating older teen students on technology and research enables them to pursue higher education opportunities. School librarians organize and manage books, media, and electronic resources, as well as carry out administrative tasks. Because school librarians teach children and teens how to use library resources, most schools require candidates to have a state license or certification.

High Paying Librarian Jobs

  • Library Director

    A library director oversees the daily operations of a community or public library. The duties of a library director vary, depending on the size of the library. Typical responsibilities include managing librarians and other staff members, organizing shelves, assisting patrons, and supervising library events. As a library director, you may also work closely with the library’s board of directors or other public officials to ensure the library stays on budget while meeting the needs of the community.

  • Data Librarian

    The majority of Data Librarian salaries across the United States currently range between $54,500 (25th percentile) and $94,500 (75th percentile) annually. This large range of salary potential suggests there may be many opportunities for advancement and increased pay depending on skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Data Librarian job market in the United States is very active, with many companies hiring.

  • Head Librarian

    The majority of Head Librarian salaries across the United States currently range between $60,000 (25th percentile) and $94,500 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Head Librarian job market in the United States is active, with some companies hiring.

  • Medical Librarian

    A medical librarian works at a university library, medical education institution, research organization, or similar medical facility. These research professionals may also find employment with nonprofit organizations or private pharmaceutical and medical device companies. As a medical librarian, your job duties include coordinating with staff on research needs, finding requested information from the medical library archive, and performing administrative work as needed. Depending on your employer, you may also maintain databases and help source research materials.

  • Digital Librarian

    As a digital librarian, you are an archivist responsible for selecting, organizing, and preserving digital information in a library, including online public library materials and genealogy record collections. Digital libraries allow public study and must be easy to access, so organizational skills are vital to this career. Your job duties include many of the same daily tasks of a traditional librarian, such as cataloging and maintaining accurate records, but you also ensure information is licensed properly, monitor budgets and expenditures, maintain vendor relationships, and supervise junior staff or assist in hiring. A career as a digital librarian requires you have significant postsecondary education, typically at least a master’s of Library Science.

  • Library Manager

    A library manager oversees the daily operations of a library. Typical job duties involve coordinating programs and services, ensuring employees and patrons follow library policies, managing the budget, updating library websites, and setting long-term objectives to promote growth. To pursue a career as a library manager, you need a bachelor’s degree in library science, although many library managers also earn a master’s degree. Other qualifications include prior management experience, strong analytical and research skills, and familiarity with all library materials and processes, including books, magazines, and digital resources.

  • Access Services Librarian

    The majority of Access Services Librarian salaries across the United States currently range between $45,000 (25th percentile) and $84,500 (75th percentile) annually. This large range of salary potential suggests there may be many opportunities for advancement and increased pay depending on skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Access Services Librarian job market in the United States is moderately active, with several companies hiring.

  • Archivist

    An archivist handles the collection and preservation of historically significant documents and artifacts. As an archivist, your primary responsibilities are to preserve and organize information of value to the public or your institution. Your job duties are to assess the value of particular records, describe and file an item within its historical context and preserve and maintain the collection of archives so current and future generations can access them. The information in a collection of archives may take many forms, including written documents, photographs, film, paintings, carvings, video, and digital media.

  • Law Librarian

    A law librarian works for a university, law school, or legal firm. Their job duties include overseeing operations, facilitating education, providing research materials to students, and validating sources. Whether working for a school or a law firm, a law librarian offers information to students or professionals and helps them access the resources that they need for work or learning the practice of law. Career qualifications include a master’s degree in library science, and some states require licensure.

  • Adult Services Librarian

    Salary range: $53,000-$79,000 per year

    The majority of Adult Services Librarian salaries across the United States currently range between $53,000 (25th percentile) and $79,000 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Adult Services Librarian job market in the United States is somewhat active, with a few companies hiring.

  • Research Librarian

    A research librarian works at an academic library at a college or university or at a public research institution, such as the New York Public Library or Library of Congress. As a research librarian, your primary duties are to assist students, scholars, and other researchers to find books and materials and provide them with advice on how to perform research related to their topic. Some academic librarians may perform their own original research as well. Others are more focused on reference services, acquisitions for their libraries, or handling rare books or other materials. Increasingly, research librarians have been working on how to integrate and advance information technology into libraries.

  • Public Services Librarian

    Salary range: $49,500-$78,000 per year

    The majority of Public Services Librarian salaries across the United States currently range between $49,500 (25th percentile) and $78,000 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Public Services Librarian job market in the United States is moderately active, with several companies hiring.

  • Collection Development Librarian

    The role of a collection development librarian is to manage, update, and develop collections of books (both print and digital), digital media, and the reference database at a library. As a collection development librarian, you handle the selection, purchase, and tracking of new materials and keep documents on all cataloging details. Your responsibilities include collaborating with staff members, managing a budget, and making recommendations on new resources. Other duties include researching statistics and reporting national trends, technologies, and best practices for data sharing, especially electronic sources. You may also assist the public with finding books or media and teach patrons how to use databases and digital resources. Some positions require managing other employees to ensure they catalog resources properly.

  • Hospital Librarian

    A hospital librarian is an information specialist and a disseminator of medical resources for hospital staff, patients, and members of the community. As a hospital librarian, your responsibilities include research, support for clinical staff, and community outreach. Your job duties include acting as website manager, finding current and relevant medical research, educating health care teams, and helping doctors and patients search for information about medical conditions, illnesses, procedures, and treatment options. You can find hospital librarian jobs at large hospital facilities, especially those with community medicine clinics and teaching hospitals that specialize in training new doctors and clinical staff.

  • Electronic Resources Librarian

    An electronic resources librarian (ERL) is responsible for electronic resources at a local, academic, or research library. This position involves using the ILS, or integrated library system, which keeps track of an item’s lifecycle. Duties of an ERL vary; if they are in acquisitions, they typically focus on accessing e-resources, negotiating licensing agreements, and purchasing materials. Access librarians establish public access to documents, assist patrons with discovery, and update the materials database. Support librarians assess technical problems with access. Qualifications typically include a master’s degree in library and information science as well as computer skills.

  • Technical Services Librarian

    A technical services librarian handles the physical and electronic materials in a facility’s collection. Your responsibilities in this career may include database maintenance to ensure that the library catalog is up-to-date. You can also focus on a particular task, such as acquisition, classification, or preservation of archival materials. Other duties may involve digital curation and collection management. You may also have to research new materials, create a budget, and train library staff.

  • Reference Librarian

    The responsibilities of a reference librarian include offering reference services to library patrons, including both individuals and groups using reference sources provided by the library. Your job is to recommend, interpret, and evaluate these information sources, create research guides, and assist users with their academic and information searches. You help the library evaluate and develop their reference collection by selecting new sources and removing outdated materials. Other duties include staying updated on new library technology and emerging information, providing presentations on various reference topics, and creating displays promoting particular library collections and services.

  • Systems Librarian

    A systems librarian oversees and maintains a library's computers and software. In this role, you update library databases and ensure that library software and hardware are working correctly. When the library needs to get new computers or update programs, the systems librarian collaborates with IT professionals to develop applications that improve library services for patrons, such as a more streamlined method of cataloging and searching for resources. Your job duties may also include implementing the new program, training library staff in using the automated systems, and troubleshooting hardware problems. Some systems librarians may also have shifts at the reference desk, helping patrons find what they need on library shelves and within the online catalog.

  • Outreach Librarian

    Salary range: $46,000-$70,500 per year

    An outreach librarian delivers library services to people unable to access normal library facilities. You develop an outreach program and implement activities and policies that make the library available to everyone in your community. You promote and administer outreach efforts, and train, supervise and coordinate staff members and volunteers to achieve effective community outreach. Additional responsibilities include choosing books and materials for outreach based on community needs and demand, scheduling the use of vehicles, managing budgets, and collecting feedback data to ensure continued success. You also maintain records and prepare reports as needed.

  • Film Librarian

    A film librarian classifies and maintains a library of many types of media, and there are two significant types of film librarians: those who work in a library or school, and those who work with radiologists. A media film librarian purchases and catalogs films and videos including movies, video and audio tapes, photographic slides, and more. Your responsibilities in this position include cataloging new video material using a specific classification system, and you track items received and those you loan to students and other individuals. You may also plan to view events or give class lectures. The duties of a radiology film librarian include filing, correcting, updating, organizing, and storing medical records for a medical business that provides diagnostic imaging services to patients. You must retrieve and hang films on lightboards for radiologists and collect any necessary paperwork for them.

  • Youth Services Librarian

    As a youth services librarian, your responsibilities are to develop a range of programs for teens and children. You can work at a public library in the children’s or young adult section or at an elementary, middle, or high school library. Your duties include being a direct resource for children and their parents, helping them to locate books or visual media, helping to assist students with research projects, and leading story time after school for children. Depending on the size of the library, you may have additional clerical or shelving duties.

  • Assistant Librarian

    An assistant librarian works closely with the main librarian to manage a library. As an assistant librarian your job involves interacting closely with library guests, working at the circulation or help desk, and answering questions. Other common duties include managing library equipment, maintaining archives, and organizing new materials. The career requires that you have an education in library science, typically at least a master’s degree, and experience as a library technician. Additional qualifications include strong communication skills and the ability to work with people from a diverse range of backgrounds. A love of books and reading is helpful.

  • Cataloger

    A cataloger typically works at a library or similar setting and catalogs its works and resources. As a cataloger, your duties include managing inventory and keeping accurate records of books and other materials available at the facility. Your responsibilities also involve maintaining the organization’s system so library guests can locate a particular piece of work using bibliographic records. In most modern libraries, this involves guests utilizing a computer system that finds books or other works using keywords. You may also be tasked with updating or developing a new method to catalog information more efficiently.

  • Library Technician

    Library technicians are assistants to the library managers. Library technicians organize books and materials, set up school programs, and help patrons find books in the library. Other responsibilities include cataloging library books, registering new patrons for library cards, and checking out materials for patrons. In addition to the duties associated with running the library, technicians are also responsible for extracurricular school activities such as art classes, reading groups, and book clubs.

  • Library Assistant

    Library assistants support the head librarian in operating the library and maintaining its materials. Other responsibilities include cataloging books, movies, audio resources, reference materials, slides, and microfilm. Library assistants inspect these items regularly for damage or missing pieces, especially while they are checking out resources to library patrons. As a library assistant, you must enjoy helping visitors locate materials, as well as providing technical assistance as needed. While a library assistant job does not require education beyond a high school diploma or equivalent, job seekers pursuing a career as a librarian will need a master’s degree in library science or a related field.