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17 of the Highest Paying Journeyman Lineman Jobs in 2024

The best Journeyman Lineman jobs can pay up to $136,000 per year.

A journeyman lineman builds and maintains the electrical power system. This is an advanced position that requires several years of experience in the field. In this career, you construct, maintain, and repair electrical distribution and transmission systems, both above and below ground. Your duties require you to be able to lift up to 50 pounds and be comfortable working at heights up to 60 feet, as you climb poles and lift equipment regularly. Responsibilities include operating aerial and excavation equipment, troubleshooting system problems, setting transformers, and more. Documentation and detailed reports are necessary. You may also train apprentices. Qualifications include apprenticeship completion, a Department of Labor Journeyman certification, a high school diploma, and the ability to work in various weather conditions.

To get a job as a journeyman lineman, you must first complete the apprentice level of training. In this entry-level position, you learn how to work with high voltage lines while assisting an experienced journeyman with maintenance and repairs of both electrical distribution and transmission systems. You are required to learn how to operate various equipment such as aerial devices, excavators, and more. It’s important to take this time to develop an understanding of all safety requirements. This job has some hazards, so safety is critical. To get into an apprenticeship, you need experience with manual labor, but it does not have to be within the electrician field.

High Paying Journeyman Lineman Jobs

  • Power Lineman

    As a power lineman, your job is to support the operations of utilities by installing and maintaining electrical lines. As part of your role, you may do construction work to fix or replace lines, use equipment to reach areas in need of repair, and teach an apprentice how to do the job. You also identify defective elements in a system, inspect and test power lines and related equipment, climb poles and transmission towers, and work in severe weather conditions. Following disasters like storms or earthquakes, you may work extended shifts if necessary.

  • Electrical Lineman

    An electrical lineman, or electrical line worker, installs and maintains power lines. Their duties include putting up or maintaining new power lines, as well as repairing broken lines or transformers. Linemen make sure electrical lines are functioning and make repairs quickly and accurately to restore electrical service to customers. Line workers work at multiple outdoor sites and at tall heights.

  • Utility Lineman

    As a utility lineman, you work for a utility company or a contractor to install, maintain, and repair electrical distribution systems. Your duties in this career usually focus on overhead power lines. You use bucket trucks or ladders or climb poles to access the lines. Your responsibilities can also include the installation and maintenance of underground cables. You dig trenches to install and access these lines. Aside from your regular maintenance and repair tasks, you respond to reports of power or utility outages. In addition to working with electrical equipment and systems, you may also repair telecommunications lines.

  • Lineman Apprentice

    A lineman apprentice is the first step on the career ladder to becoming a journeyman lineman and, eventually, a master lineman. The duties of a lineman apprentice are to assist company linemen in building and maintaining electrical power systems. Lineman apprentice responsibilities include taking measurements and helping journeyman linemen with equipment and various tasks. Apprenticeships promote economic development because as a lineman apprentice, you get paid during your on-the-job training.

  • Lineman

    A Lineman, also known as a line worker, is an electrician responsible for installing and repairing wire cables and electrical power wiring. As a Lineman, you climb telephone poles and work while hanging many feet above the ground. A Lineman also operates and repairs equipment to ensure telephones, internet, and other communication needs are met.

  • Line Clearance Foreman

    Salary range: $32,500-$59,000 per year

    The majority of Line Clearance Foreman salaries across the United States currently range between $32,500 (25th percentile) and $59,000 (75th percentile) annually. This large range of salary potential suggests there may be many opportunities for advancement and increased pay depending on skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the Line Clearance Foreman job market in the United States is active, with some companies hiring.

  • Aerial Lineman

    As an aerial lineman, your duties revolve around the installation, maintenance, and repair of overhead or buried power lines or cabling used for electrical or power distribution systems. You climb poles or transmission towers to assess issues with the line or to connect a line to a construction site as it nears completion. You can find aerial lineman positions with power companies, utility providers, construction operations, or private contractors. You use a variety of specialized tools, such as cable splicers and climbing equipment.

  • Line Maintenance Technician

    Salary range: $36,000-$48,500 per year

    The majority of Line Maintenance Technician salaries across the United States currently range between $36,000 (25th percentile) and $48,500 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Line Maintenance Technician job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Wireline Operator

    A wireline operator installs cabling that enables a company to lower equipment into a gas or oil well. As a wireline operator, your job duties include designing the project, analyzing data on potential field sites, drilling the holes, and installing the mechanical equipment or cabling rig necessary to fulfill the plan. You may also perform equipment maintenance. A wireline operator must understand the regulations and safety codes related to gas exploration and reclamation.

  • Line Tender

    Salary range: $30,000-$42,500 per year

    The majority of Line Tender salaries across the United States currently range between $30,000 (25th percentile) and $42,500 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Line Tender job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Wire Harness Assembler

    As a wire harness assembler, you route and tie wires together to form wire harnesses, which are often referred to as cables. In this role, you may assemble and cut harnesses based on provided designs, install these harnesses in the designated locations, inspect components to ensure they are correct, and perform other tasks like soldering when necessary. You also repair damaged harnesses, including those located in hard-to-reach areas. This job title refers exclusively to creating cables and should not be confused with assembly jobs where you may wear a harness while working in elevated areas.

  • Wire Bender

    Salary range: $37,000-$39,000 per year

    The majority of Wire Bender salaries across the United States currently range between $37,000 (25th percentile) and $39,000 (75th percentile) annually. Most people working in this role make similar salaries regardless of skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Wire Bender job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Line Service Technician

    A line service technician works for an airline or airport support company and helps ensure the safety of departing and arriving aircraft. As a line service technician, your job duties include directing planes to and from the gate, checking fuel and water supplies, and handling baggage and trash removal. However, you generally do not perform repairs or check instruments on the plane like certified mechanics. The career typically requires a high school diploma or GED certificate, a valid driver’s license, and previous work experience in an airport. Some employers also offer on-the-job training for entry-level applicants. Additional qualifications include the ability to operate airport equipment, excellent communication and technical skills, as well as attention to detail.

  • Line Worker

    A line worker performs assembly tasks in a production line to construct products for use in the aerospace, automotive, medical, or manufacturing industries. As a line worker, your job duties include standing for long periods of time at an assembly line, working on repetitive tasks, rotating tasks with other line workers, and providing feedback to production managers about possible improvements for the production line process. To be a line worker, you need physical strength and stamina, the ability to use industry tools, data entry skills, and, for some jobs, experience with computer-aided design (CAD) software.

  • Line Inspector

    The majority of Line Inspector salaries across the United States currently range between $36,000 (25th percentile) and $38,000 (75th percentile) annually. Most people working in this role make similar salaries regardless of skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Line Inspector job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Line Crew Supervisor

    Salary range: $22,000-$34,500 per year

    The majority of Line Crew Supervisor salaries across the United States currently range between $22,000 (25th percentile) and $34,500 (75th percentile) annually. This moderate range of salaries suggests pay in this role will be consistent, regardless skill level, location and years of experience, though some advancement is possible. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Line Crew Supervisor job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.

  • Line Person

    Salary range: $25,000-$27,000 per year

    The majority of Line Person salaries across the United States currently range between $25,000 (25th percentile) and $27,000 (75th percentile) annually. Most people working in this role make similar salaries regardless of skill level, location and years of experience. Based on recent job posting activity on ZipRecruiter, the Line Person job market in the United States is not very active as few companies are currently hiring for this role. You can try exploring related titles to find jobs with more active opportunities.