The healthcare field is thriving and growing faster than ever. With a variety of jobs and positions, you can start your medical career today. If you love interacting with patients, consider a career as a nurse or medical technician. If numbers are more your thing, apply for a job as a medical administrator. Check out these top medical jobs!

1. Pharmacist

Pharmacists are licensed professionals who provide patients with medicine and wellness information. They fill prescription medications and instruct patients on how to take them and of potential side effects. Pharmacists also support patients by checking if medications interact negatively with existing conditions and offering immunizations. They often work in pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, and universities.

2. Nurse Practitioner

Nurse practitioners are advanced practice registered nurses with additional responsibilities including prescribing medication, examining patients, diagnosing illnesses, and providing treatment, much like physicians do. Nurse practitioners are educated and trained to provide health care services, such as the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness and chronic conditions.

3. Physician Assistant

A physician assistant (PA) typically works in hospitals or medical practice clinics to aid doctors in routine and emergency procedures. On a daily basis, physician assistants perform many medical-provider tasks, including examining patients and obtaining patient histories. They interpret diagnostic test results, assist in surgical operations, and work closely with doctors to develop a patient's course of treatment.

4. Rn

An RN (Registered Nurse) is a health care worker who assists physicians with patient care. They work in hospitals and physician offices, taking patient vital signs and administer medication. A bachelor’s degree or an associate degree in nursing is required, as well as a state nursing license. The RN will oversee patient administration and documentation, and at times may provide emergency care.

5. LPN

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nurse who performs patient care and administrative tasks, varying from clerical duties to the administering of medications. They are valuable assets who work under the supervision of registered nurses (RNs) and doctors. LPNs generally work in traditional healthcare settings like hospitals, nursing homes, or group homes. LPNs can also work in private homes if needed.

6. Dental Assistant

The job of a dental assistant is to provide a significant portion of the care that a patient receives during a dentist visit. They are a vital part of any dental practice, though their specific duties vary by state and by the dentists' offices where they work. Their responsibilities can include preparing and sterilizing equipment and processing x-rays, as well as administrative tasks like scheduling appointments.

7. Phlebotomist

A phlebotomist is a healthcare worker who draws and documents blood samples. They work directly with patients or donors, following strict sanitation and confidentiality rules while handling and labeling blood samples, instruments, and records. A Phlebotomy Technician Certificate or license from a governing healthcare board is often required. Phlebotomists must communicate clearly and effectively with all patients.

8. Pharmacy Technician

Pharmacy Technicians work under a pharmacist and fulfill several important duties. They are responsible for distributing prescription and nonprescription medications to people and providing patients with important information regarding their medicine. They may also be responsible for putting orders together, supervising other staff members, and managing the dispensary.

9. Medical Assistant

A medical assistant provides direct and immediate support to a nurse or physician to make their job easier and improve the quality of patient care. They perform a number of duties, including administrative and clinical, as well as help the patient feel at ease by answering any questions they may have. The duties of a medical assistant greatly depend on the setting they work in.

10. CNA

A certified nursing assistant (CNA) is an assistant to registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) on a medical staff. CNAs to tend to the patients within their ward, completing tasks that the RNs and LPNs may not have the time to get to. In some cases, a CNA may be the medical attendant a patient interacts with most frequently.