What Are the Best Occupations for INFJ Personality Types?

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The INFJ personality is characterized as a counselor—someone who is conscientious, intuitive, empathetic, and creative. Scoring as an INFJ means your personality type is reflected in these four qualities: Introverted, Intuition, Feeling, and Judging. INFJ career advice encourages the pursuit of careers in healthcare, education, social work, human resources, clergy, and the arts.

What is an INFJ like?

Myers-Briggs categorizes 16 personalities types. INFJs make up only 1-3% of the general population, making it the rarest personality type. They are quiet and reserved individuals, preferring to have a few close friends rather than a wide circle of acquaintances. INFJs value their privacy and are sensitive, goal-oriented, and perfectionistic. Often referred to on their MBTI test as counselors or idealists, their empathetic and thoughtful nature is seen as altruistic and insightful. INFJ careers should make the most out of these strengths.

What are INFJs like in the workplace?

INFJs are behind-the-scenes players. Careers for INFJs often match up well with careers for introverts. Though quiet, they are dedicated and principled workers who can be called upon to take the lead and carry out complex projects. INFJs enjoy peaceful work environments where they have the time and space to fully develop their ideas and work out plans. They should favor career choices that point them towards meaningful, humanity-based causes that contribute to others’ well-being. INFJs are more likely to manage a large team and have above average salaries. There are many suitable careers for INFJs in the current economy.

INFJ Career Advice

INFJs should pursue the types of careers that make the most of their strengths. This could be researching in a quiet lab environment, writing in the privacy of their homes, or meeting patients in a private office. The best INFJ careers put intuition, empathy, and altruism to good use. INFJ jobs to avoid include competitive fields that are results-driven with little concern for the wider world. Jobs in marketing, advertising, sales, IT, and customer service might be poor career choices for INFJs. Here are some of the best jobs for INFJs.

1. Counselor

Counselors help individuals, couples, families, and groups of people dealing with issues that affect their mental health and well-being. Empathetic INFJs work as counselors in a variety of settings including abuse centers, hospitals, governments, schools, and private practices. Counselors report high rates of job satisfaction when they take successfully guide their patients toward positive choices.

2. Psychologist

Psychology is a natural fit for an INFJ personality type. All of the attributes of this type are helpful in studying and evaluating human behavior. Whether they work in a lab, doing clinical research, or run a private therapy practice, INFJs will find that their empathy and thoughtfulness will serve them will in many branches of the psychology profession.

3. Scientist

A career as a scientist might be an excellent choice for an INFJ. This personality type thrives in peaceful work environments, such as a laboratory. INFJs also enjoy the intellectual challenge of a career in the natural sciences. Examples of good science-based jobs for an INFJ include chemist and environmental scientist.

4. Designer

Artistic INFJs might find graphic design to be an ideal career path. Between layout, color, text, and even subtext, the INFJ graphic designer has tremendous influence over the aesthetics of the final product. They find great satisfaction in connecting with their audiences through their work.

5. Writer

INFJs often pursue creative careers as they are elegant communicators. They can write anything from screenplays and popular blogs to short stories and novels. INFJs are clever and bring wit and interest to any piece of communication they get their hands on.

6. Human Resources

Several INFJ personality traits make working in human resources a great fit. Human resources generalists and specialists are trained to perform both planning and administrative hiring duties. They are organized and highly dedicated, and empathetically guide new employees through complicated benefits and compensation. They also have the crucial and detailed task of complying with all local, state, and federal HR regulations.

7. Librarian

Libraries are home to advanced electronic resources and digital records, and skilled librarians are trained to find exactly what patrons need. Being a librarian would provide a quiet work environment for an INFJ. This career also allows multiple opportunities for community outreach, which appeals to INFJs’ helpful and resourceful nature.

8. Professor

INFJs love breaking down complex problems, and professors must be able to make complicated subjects easily digestible for their students. The duties of a professor might include planning lessons, assessing students, publishing original research, and meeting academic and administrative policies.

9. Non-Profit/Advocacy

Putting their passion behind a cause they believe in can be a powerful call for INFJs. Thousands of organizations and agencies exist to improve the common good through charitable, educational, scientific, religious, and humanitarian efforts.

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